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Narcolepsy and Driving Laws

In the US, most states implement a voluntary procedure to determine a person’s medical ability to drive and some may also allow for medical professionals or family members to submit concerns to the department of motor vehicles. Some states may also encourage licensed drivers to self-report or limit their driving time. While most states do not specifically list narcolepsy as an underlying reason to have a license revoked, some do name it as a condition that may affect the ability to drive.

See this PDF for a complete list of driving laws for each state or see the map below. Hover over the state for a brief synopsis or click on the state for more information.

AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY DC

Color Key

Blue: Drivers are expected to self-report and are asked about medical conditions on the driver’s license application.
Red: States where reporting is mandatory.
Orange: States where the reporting requirements are unclear but could be interpreted as requiring doctors to report narcolepsy.
Yellow: States specifically mention narcolepsy, but do not have reporting requirements.
Green: States do not ask about medical conditions.

Two sites to follow for more information on driving laws as they relate to chronic medical conditions are the American Diabetes Association and the Epilepsy Foundation.

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